Blog

Considering Separation or Divorce?

Posted by Louisa on 10 December 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

Considering separation or divorce? This is a guest blog by Karen Marshall from Love Coaching You.  There is a link to Louisa and Karen’t joint facebook live talking about this further down the page.  Karen can be found via the following links: LoveCoachingYou.com Twitter@LoveCoachingYou FB@LoveCoachingYou Considering separation or divorce is an emotive question and will mean something different to everyone… Read More »

Should we stay together for the kids?

Posted by Nick Arora on 03 December 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

This is a topic that comes up in family mediation from time to time. We sometimes see a couple who recognise that their relationship is not working well and one has taken the decision to end it but the other felt they should have stayed together until the children left home so as not to ‘break up the family’. This… Read More »

What is a good divorce?

Posted by Nick Arora on 26 November 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

This is a particularly leading question for some of the people that come to us for family mediation. How on earth can a divorce ever be good we can hear people saying. Well sometimes both parties accept that the relationship has reached the end of the road and that it needs to end and they want to do it as… Read More »

Do you need a lawyer when you separate?

Posted by Nick Arora on 19 November 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

This is a question that we get asked a lot by clients that have come directly to family mediation rather than seeking advice from a lawyer first. Often both clients have come to the conclusion that their relationship has reached the end of the road at the same time. They want to maintain an amicable relationship and they have some… Read More »

They didn’t see the children that much anyway……….

Posted by Louisa on 12 November 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

Lots of the blog posts we put up come from conversations with clients or things we see a lot in family mediation.  We are always of the view that if one separating couple is struggling with someone then another separating couple may well be too and it would be helpful to put some guidance and support out there to help… Read More »

What’s new in 2019?

Posted by Louisa on 05 November 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

From the moment I set up LKW Family Mediation I have had an almost constant stream of ideas for things that would benefit clients and help with life after separation and coping with divorce.  I also wanted to assist other professionals to help clients too, and to understand more about family mediation.  The difficulty has always been having enough time… Read More »

Do you need therapy when you separate?

Posted by Louisa on 29 October 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

Talking about mental health issues is something that has been in the news a lot lately and this is important to help to reduce the stigma surrounding emotional and brain chemistry problems.  In mediation meetings we always like to know whether anyone has had counselling, whether they found it helpful, and whether they are open to trying this in the… Read More »

Why do people end up in court?

Posted by Louisa on 22 October 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

The family justice system is struggling with the number of people using the court system, a lack of judges, the demands on support services like CAFCASS and the unreasonable demands that many of those using the system have.  This means that by the time you have got to the first hearing in your application you could often have had at… Read More »

Arrangements for Children: Review and take stock

Posted by Louisa on 15 October 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

We have recently been doing a series of blogs focusing on how you can minimise the effects of your separation on your children.  Tip number 5 was to review the arrangements that you have made.  We suggest that you check in with each other regularly (say every 3 to 6 months depending on how long you think the arrangements need… Read More »

Stopping things turning nasty

Posted by Louisa on 08 October 2018 in categories: Blog , Family Mediation

When you separate from a partner there can be a whole myriad of emotions.  Anger, resentment and fear are common and it is sometimes from a place seeped with these emotions that each party reacts.  When you react from a place of anger or fear you can often be seen as being aggressive or threatening.  A defensive reaction is often… Read More »

When you separate from a partner there can be a whole myriad of emotions.  Anger, resentment and fear are common and it is sometimes from a place seeped with these emotions that each party reacts.  When you react from a place of anger or fear you can often be seen as being aggressive or threatening.  A defensive reaction is often one designed to launch a preemptive attack and to wound before you are wound-ed.  Our brains are complicated machines but when we feel threatened we often react in the same we would have done when facing a large animal as a caveman.  It is not with rationale, strategy or compassion.

There is no ‘one size fits all’ separation but there are common themes that often run through the situation when things are starting to get heated.  Ask yourself honestly if any of these apply to you:

  1. The decision to separate was made by you and your ex-partner is struggling to come to terms with this.  Or you may be the person who is struggling to come to terms with things.  It takes time to deal with a separation and there is a whole grieving/healing process that people go through.  Often the person who made the decision to separate has been contemplating it for some time and is therefore further head in their recovery.  There is also no set time frame and what may take on person six months may take another two years.  If you find that you or your ex partner are reacting angrily or aggressively in discussions then maybe one of you (or both of you) need a little more time before making long term decisions.
  2. Do you feel heard?  Do you think that your ex partner feels heard?  Feeling that you’re not being listened to is one of the most frustrating things.  It is often a trigger for adults and children alike.  Being in an upsetting situation and feeling that you are not having your point of view taken seriously, or your concerns are not being taken on board can quickly make a calm discussion escalate.  It’s important that both parties take time to hear each other and to understand the other’s point if view.  It doesn’t mean you have to agree with it.  It is impossible to resolve an issue if you don’t fully understand what the issue is.
  3. A separation can also act as a trigger for other issues that have been unresolved during your life.  Things that you may have felt you had put to bed may come back because you are feeling similar emotions following the decision to separate.  It can feel overwhelming going through so many emotions, or feeling such intense feelings.  Dealing with all this on top of having to hold down a job and look after children can quickly feel like overload.  In this situation it’s easy to react from a place of ‘I can’t deal with another thing’.  If you feel like that, or you can see that happening in your partner then it’s important to address.  Work out whether there is anything you can temporarily shelve or get help with.  If you feel it runs deeper than that then it might be time to get extra help from your GP or a therapist.

If discussions between you and your ex partner are becoming heated then it’s important to take action as soon as possible and especially so if these discussions are taking place anywhere near your children.  Just because you’re in another room doesn’t mean they don’t know it’s happening.  Have you ever turned up somewhere and instinctively known that the couple you’re meeting have just had a large argument?  It’s the same for children.  Doing the same thing over and over again is likely to generate the same outcome.  So try to do something differently.

Working out what is triggering you to become angry or fearful will often help.  Look at whether a different location, or another time of day would make discussions calmer.  A coffee shop may be a better place to talk rather than the home you previously shared.  If you’re really struggling then consider trying mediation so that a specially trained mediator can help you to look at ways to get communication back on track.

You can also sign up to our free mailing list to get tips on improving your communication.

 

' displayText='ShareThis'>
1 2 3 10

Blog Categories

Twitter Feeds